Appalachian Center for Equality

Youth take center stage at poverty forum

Members of the BAPS (Believing All is Possible!) youth leadership program in Logan, West Virginia were front and center at a community forum about child poverty in March 2013.  Sponsored by AFSC and a dozen other organizations, the forum focused on prison overcrowding, teen pregnancy prevention, family violence prevention, and parent education.  Advocates as well as people impacted by poverty spoke.

Coal-country teenager wants better resources to keep peers in school

Kyra Wells

ACE participant Kyra Wells.

In late February Kyra Wells, a sophomore at Logan High School in West Virginia, was at the State Capitol, meeting with staff of Governor Tomblin. She brought up an issue that is on her mind and on the minds of many of her peers in rural Appalachia: teen pregnancy.         

“A lot of young women are getting pregnant,” Kyra said. “What could you do to prevent it?”

Boone County Youth Advocate for Fairness

On March 5th, youth leaders of EPIC (Empowered Prioritized Intelligent Chicks) of Sherman High School in Boone County, West Virginia advocated for the Employment and Housing Nondiscrimination Act (EHNDA) at the State Capitol.  Frustrated about bullying and discrimination around sexual orientation at their high school, they learned about advocacy at the state level in order to make change locally.  

Logan Youth Speak Up About Poverty in WV

On February 26th, 2013  BAPS youth leadership group, a program of the American Friends Service Committee, traveled to the State Capitol for Kids and Families Day, to participate in the kickoff of the statewide child poverty campaign, Our Children, Our Future: The Campaign to End Child Poverty.

Logan Child Poverty Community Forum

Saturday, March 16, 2013 - 11:00am - 12:30pm

Kyra and Jaylin

At Kids and Families Day at State Capitol ready to speak up about poverty

Addiction? Incarceration? Unemployment? Obesity?  All these issues stem from vulnerable families trying to get by on a wage that is not live-able or in communities where jobs are scarce.  In 1970, the median job paid roughly $20/hour. Today, it's less than half that.  Our country can thrive when people have the means to rise out of poverty.

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AFSC is a Quaker organization devoted to service, development, and peace programs throughout the world. Our work is based on the belief in the worth of every person, and faith in the power of love to overcome violence and injustice. Learn more

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AFSC has offices around the world. To see a complete list see the Where We Work page.

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