Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 7:00pm

During Lent, Christians remember that Jesus, like countless others, was tortured to death by the forces of an army occupying his own country. Today, there are men, women and children who experience torture due to political repression, solitary confinement, sexual and gender-based violence, and more. How do we live and understand a world where these practices still happen and are perpetrated in our name (through the government)? What is our response as people who seek to end torture practices (and all injustices and suffering)?

John Neafsey's newest book: Crucified People, attempts to address these questions from a theological, societal and psychological perspective. John will read some excerpts from the book, followed by a discussion. Books will be available for purchase.

John Neafsey is a staff psychologist at the Heartland Alliance Marjorie Kovler Center, a treatment center in Chicago for survivors of torture. He is the author of A Sacred Voice is Calling, Personal Vocation and Social Conscience, which won two Catholic Press Association Book Awards.

ALL ARE WELCOME.

If you are not able to join us, you can check it out/purchase it here :http://www.orbisbooks.com/crucified-people.html

"In this timely and soul-searching work, John Neafsey explores the relation between Christ's passion and the ongoing practice of torture in our world, Drawing on his own experience in treating victims of torture, Neafsey explores the psychological and spiritual impact of this abuse on its victims, and on the torturers, as well. This theme opens into a wider reflection on those Ignacio Ellacuria called "the crucified peoples of history." When we see Christ in these victims, spiritual discernment must be joined by social analysis and action. What have we done to put these people on the cross? What must we do to take them down? Finally, Neafsey explores the possibilities for healing and redemption, especially the challenge for all of us to become more deeply human by awakening from what Jon Sobrino calls "the sleep of inhumanity.”