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Arnie Alpert details how, through public education, a coalition working to stop the state from privatizing its prisons was able to shift public opinion and elected officials' position on the issue over the course of two years.

[Arnie offers a correction to his statement at 3:43: Caroline's speaking tour in New Hampshire was held in fall 2012, not 2011.]

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AFSC's Linda Lewis shares photos from the day in May 2013 she spent seeing the sights in Pyongyang, DPRK (North Korea), where people were out rollerblading, playing cards, and boating in the Taedong River.

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Linda Lewis, AFSC's country representative for China and the DPRK (North Korea), describes her May 2013 trip to partner farms and organizations in North Korea, where farm managers are working to introduce sustainable practices and improve yields.

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In this two-minute video reflection, AFSC's Midwest Region offers its thanks to AFSC supporters everywhere.

Origami by Patti McKee. Text below.

The Making of a Star
Symbol of the American Friends Service Committee

When young Quakers drove ambulances during World War I in France, they didn’t see themselves as heroes.

Instead, what drove them is what drives us, the American Friends Service Committee, nearly 100 years later.

They saw then, as we see now,

that injustice fuels conflict

and violence only results in more violence.

 

But they also saw then, as we see now,

a higher truth.

That there is that of God in all people.

and, as Dr. King said 50 years later,

only Light can drive out darkness

and only love can drive out hate.

 

Friends chose then, as we choose still,

A star to symbolize our nonviolent work.

Red and black, with eight points

(and a little hourglass in the middle).

 

They knew then, as we know now,

That AFSC doesn’t make stars – or heroes.

The stars are all around us.

The stars are within us.

The stars are you.

 

Thank you for your support of the American Friends Service Committee.

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The U.S.-Mexico border is one of the most militarized borders in the world, with billions of dollars spent on border security every year. Quina, an AFSC intern in Greensboro, N.C., grew up near the U.S.-Canada border and later lived in Tucson near the U.S.-Mexico border. Struck by the differences, she shares what "border security" means to her.

 

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Joshua Saleem describes some of his experiences doing AFSC peace education work in high schools in St. Louis. In this three-minute video, Joshua focuses on a peace ball project chosen by students at Northwest Academy of Law.

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Ghaisha came to the U.S. from Niger seeking asylum. Now a U.S. citizen and member of the Greensboro, N.C. community, she shares the story of a friend who was denied an organ transplant because he is undocumented.

 

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In recognition of World Refugee Day on June 20, and in honor of the thousands of refugees who now call Iowa home, AFSC Iowa’s Immigrants Voice Program (IVP) presents this four-minute video of one mother and son, reunited after 14 years of being apart.

As Hannah describes in the video, the lives of her and her son were saved by an older woman in Liberia, a stranger from a different tribe, who claimed them as her own. “This is how we got safe,” Hannah says. “I didn’t even know her name, yet I was her daughter.”

Upon his arrival at the airport in Des Moines, Hannah and Sherriff didn't even recognize each other. Thanks to photos on Facebook, Hannah's daughter helped identify Sherriff among the arriving passengers.

Currently, Sherriff is learning about computer systems administration. Hannah works in an elderly care facility and is studying nursing.

AFSC-IVP’s legal services program, directed by Jody Mashek, assists 300 refugees and immigrants each year from countries around the world, bringing families together and helping people find opportunity in their new home.

For a great source of up-to-date information about refugee resettlement, check out http://www.culturalorientation.net/learning/arrivals.

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Four advocates of healing justice share their experiences and explain why restorative rather than punitive practices work better for all involved. Kris Miner, Henry Wesley, John Stuart and Denise Breton all participated in a restorative justice convening organized by AFSC in Minneapolis on April 23, 2013.

Sharon Goens, AFSC Healing Justice Program Director in the Twin Cities, organized the convening along with Alice Lynch and Stephanie Autumn. To view a set of photos from the convening, please click here.

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The ancient annual procession and blessing of San Ysidro y Santa María de la Cabeza will commence at 10am, on Saturday, May 18th at the corner of Isleta and Arenal, SW. Prayers to these traditional guardians of rain, water, and farmers will take place at La Plazita Farm, the procession's end, found at the corner of Arenal and Lopez, SW. Call 505-842-7343 for more information. Please bring seeds if you wish to participate in an exchange. The San Ysidro y Santa María blessing ceremony is sponsored by the American Friends Service Committee, La Plazita Institute, and the South Valley Regional Association of Acequias. 

La anual y antigua ceremonia de San Ysidro y Santa María de la Cabeza comenzará a las 10am, el sábado, 18 de mayo en la esquina de Isleta y Arenal, SW. Al final de la procesión, se llevarán a cabo oraciones a estos tradicionales guardianes del agua, la lluvia y los agricultores en la finca de La Plazita ubicada en Arenal y Lopez, SW. Para más información, favor de llamar al 505-842-7343. Si desea, puede traer semillas para intercambiar. La ceremonia de bendición de San Ysidro y Santa María de la Cabeza está patrocinada por American Friends Service Committee, La Plazita Institute, y South Valley Regional Association of Acequias.

Who we are

AFSC is a Quaker organization devoted to service, development, and peace programs throughout the world. Our work is based on the belief in the worth of every person, and faith in the power of love to overcome violence and injustice. Learn more

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