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Budding immigrant filmmakers debuted their 3-minute masterpieces to a standing room only crowd at International House Charlotte on Friday, March 16, 2012. A story of treacherous journeys across the sea and prison escapes mingled with personal stories of a marriage broken by abuse, a student’s journey from a refugee camp to a Charlotte school, and an account of how a family got its start in the United States. Each story was different, but each painted a picture of the external and internal struggles faced by immigrants in North Carolina today.

The second Storyology: Digital Storytelling by Immigrants and Refugees class brought together six immigrants and refugees from Eritrea, Mexico, Bhutan, Colombia and Ecuador for three weekends of participatory workshops on storytelling, audio and video editing and community building. A seventh student, unfortunately, had to drop out of the class after being hospitalized with pneumonia. The class utilized interactive storytelling techniques, laptop computers, photographs, oral histories, digital cameras and music, sharing skills with the new documentarians that last a lifetime.

Storyology is unique in that it empowers immigrants to tell their own stories in their own words. As one student expressed, “I got an opportunity to share my own story and my own feelings. I got more experience by sharing my story, how I live in my country, how I deal with my hindrances. And I like to collaborate with my friends, and [get to] know their story too, my international friends, Mexican friends, African friends. I learned their stories , their own feelings, their experiences…I really appreciate this class; I am really joyful… I love this class!” Another student reported that “I did learn how to make a video, but most important, I learned about other cultures and people. My expectations were exceeded!”

Volunteer Martin Doherty expressed that the class gave him “a profound opportunity to recognize my values as an American and move forward the quality of every human life… I’m honored to be helping other people tell their stories so more respect and more care is given to human beings around the world.”

The class was sponsored by the American Friends Service Committee and International House Charlotte, with funding provided by the Charlotte Arts & Science Council. You can view videos produced in the class atwww.youtube.com/afscnc.

 

See video

 

Budding immigrant filmmakers debuted their 3-minute masterpieces to a standing room only crowd at International House Charlotte on Friday, March 16, 2012. A story of treacherous journeys across the sea and prison escapes mingled with personal stories of a marriage broken by abuse, a student’s journey from a refugee camp to a Charlotte school, and an account of how a family got its start in the United States. Each story was different, but each painted a picture of the external and internal struggles faced by immigrants in North Carolina today.

The second Storyology: Digital Storytelling by Immigrants and Refugees class brought together six immigrants and refugees from Eritrea, Mexico, Bhutan, Colombia and Ecuador for three weekends of participatory workshops on storytelling, audio and video editing and community building. A seventh student, unfortunately, had to drop out of the class after being hospitalized with pneumonia. The class utilized interactive storytelling techniques, laptop computers, photographs, oral histories, digital cameras and music, sharing skills with the new documentarians that last a lifetime.

Storyology is unique in that it empowers immigrants to tell their own stories in their own words. As one student expressed, “I got an opportunity to share my own story and my own feelings. I got more experience by sharing my story, how I live in my country, how I deal with my hindrances. And I like to collaborate with my friends, and [get to] know their story too, my international friends, Mexican friends, African friends. I learned their stories , their own feelings, their experiences…I really appreciate this class; I am really joyful… I love this class!” Another student reported that “I did learn how to make a video, but most important, I learned about other cultures and people. My expectations were exceeded!”

Volunteer Martin Doherty expressed that the class gave him “a profound opportunity to recognize my values as an American and move forward the quality of every human life… I’m honored to be helping other people tell their stories so more respect and more care is given to human beings around the world.”

The class was sponsored by the American Friends Service Committee and International House Charlotte, with funding provided by the Charlotte Arts & Science Council. You can view videos produced in the class atwww.youtube.com/afscnc.

See video

Budding immigrant filmmakers debuted their 3-minute masterpieces to a standing room only crowd at International House Charlotte on Friday, March 16, 2012. A story of treacherous journeys across the sea and prison escapes mingled with personal stories of a marriage broken by abuse, a student’s journey from a refugee camp to a Charlotte school, and an account of how a family got its start in the United States. Each story was different, but each painted a picture of the external and internal struggles faced by immigrants in North Carolina today.

The second Storyology: Digital Storytelling by Immigrants and Refugees class brought together six immigrants and refugees from Eritrea, Mexico, Bhutan, Colombia and Ecuador for three weekends of participatory workshops on storytelling, audio and video editing and community building. A seventh student, unfortunately, had to drop out of the class after being hospitalized with pneumonia. The class utilized interactive storytelling techniques, laptop computers, photographs, oral histories, digital cameras and music, sharing skills with the new documentarians that last a lifetime.

Storyology is unique in that it empowers immigrants to tell their own stories in their own words. As one student expressed, “I got an opportunity to share my own story and my own feelings. I got more experience by sharing my story, how I live in my country, how I deal with my hindrances. And I like to collaborate with my friends, and [get to] know their story too, my international friends, Mexican friends, African friends. I learned their stories , their own feelings, their experiences…I really appreciate this class; I am really joyful… I love this class!” Another student reported that “I did learn how to make a video, but most important, I learned about other cultures and people. My expectations were exceeded!”

Volunteer Martin Doherty expressed that the class gave him “a profound opportunity to recognize my values as an American and move forward the quality of every human life… I’m honored to be helping other people tell their stories so more respect and more care is given to human beings around the world.”

The class was sponsored by the American Friends Service Committee and International House Charlotte, with funding provided by the Charlotte Arts & Science Council. You can view videos produced in the class atwww.youtube.com/afscnc.

See video

Budding immigrant filmmakers debuted their 3-minute masterpieces to a standing room only crowd at International House Charlotte on Friday, March 16, 2012.  A story of treacherous journeys across the sea and prison escapes mingled with personal stories of a marriage broken by abuse, a student’s journey from a refugee camp to a Charlotte school, and an account of how a family got its start in the United States. 

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Tax Day Statement delivered to Sen. Roy Blunt.

The statement reminded Sen. Blunt that, "There is not a need for “austerity.” The causes of our economic problems are:

  • Tax Cuts, Tax Cheating Corporations and Ultra-Rich Tax Dodgers;
  • Financial Speculation and Policies Favoring only the 1%; and
  • Excessive Military Spending instead of investments in our future!

The statement called upon the Senator "to make all corporations pay their fair share. Further we ask you to close corporate tax loopholes, raise revenues through fair taxation on corporations and the wealthiest 1%, make deep cuts to the Pentagon budget and invest in job creation and community needs!"

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On April 17, 2012, Tax Day over 150 area residents stood up, marched and placed the blame for the U.S.’s economic suffering directly where it belonged: Tax cuts and tax cheats; Financial Speculation and Policies Favoring only the 1%; and excessive military spending.

This video is of the delivery of the overdue tax bill to Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC), one of the 2010 top 20 Pentagon contractors.

 As part of the delivery Army veteran, Carl Greer, told us “corporations like Computer Sciences Corporation have a direct effect on the treatment of wounded soldiers. There’s been a $10 million reduction in spending by the Veterans Administration in Kansas City alone. We’re tired of these wars. They are only free money for corporations like CSC…

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On April 17, 2012, Tax Day over 150 area residents stood up, marched and placed the blame for the U.S.’s economic suffering directly where it belonged: Tax cuts and tax cheats; Financial Speculation and Policies Favoring only the 1%; and excessive military spending.

This video is of the delivery of the overdue tax bill to Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC), one of the 2010 top 20 Pentagon contractors.

As part of the delivery Dave Pack, AFSC KC program committee clerk, represented Pres. D. D. Eisenhower, and reminded us, “Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms in not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children.”

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On April 17, 2012, Tax Day over 150 area residents stood up, marched and placed the blame for the U.S.’s economic suffering directly where it belonged: Tax cuts and tax cheats; Financial Speculation and Policies Favoring only the 1%; and excessive military spending.

This video is of the delivery of the overdue tax bill to Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC), one of the 2010 top 20 Pentagon contractors.

As part of the delivery Ira Harritt, AFSC KC program coordinator, comment, “There is no hope for our future while the largest corporations and the richest 1% craft tax codes and other legislation to enrich themselves and impoverish the rest of us...    Wasting 60% of our tax dollars on wars while underfunding education, health care and investments for our future for the sake of corporate profits is immoral and self destructive for our nation.”

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Celine Toussaint recently graduated from a technical training program co-sponsored by AFSC's Haiti Program. Her story is told here by Danika Jeanton, communications assistant for AFSC in Haiti.

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On May 28, 2010, Anastasio Hernández Rojas, a 42-year old construction worker, husband, father of five children, and long-time resident of San Diego, was brutally beaten and repeatedly shot with a Taser while handcuffed, and died as a result of this assault by U.S. Border Patrol agents near the San Ysidro Port of Entry in San Diego.

The violent incident occurred during rush hour in one of the busiest land ports on the U.S.-Mexico border. Witnesses pleaded with the border agents to stop the beating, but they did not. Despite community outcry, protests, and countless meetings with agency leadership, the Border Patrol has taken no public action to hold the agents involved accountable.

Sadly, Anastasio’s death was not unique. Since 2010, Border Patrol agents have killed at least seven residents of border communities and left several others seriously wounded. Along with Anastasio’s wife and children, the other families are still waiting for justice after Border Patrol agents killed their loved ones.

Along with the Southern Border Communities Coalition, we are asking President Obama to open an investigation into these deaths, and to hold accountable those who committed these acts.

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