Washington DC

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How to be human: Youth leading youth in D.C.

“Starting this human rights program has shown us how to be better human beings for ourselves and the world around us” claims Mika, a M.O.M.I.E.S. youth ambassador and 8th grader at Howard University Middle School in Washington, D.C. Throughout the year, M.O.M.I.E.S. (Mentoring of Minorities in the Education System) ambassadors in D.C. have learned about their human rights and started advocating for social change.

Students address gun violence in D.C.

What motivates young people to take action on their beliefs? Human rights learning, and the DC Human Rights project in particular, might be an important piece of the puzzle.

On March 28, 2013—a National Day to Demand Action on Gun Violence—Andy Bloom and Diana Chicas, 17-year-old students from Wilson High School in Washington, D.C., came to City Hall to speak with Councilwoman Mary Cheh about gun violence.

Changing hearts and minds in Washington, D.C.

Milca Kouame in DC

Milca Kouame meeting with White House staff

AFSC staff member Jessica Roach looks on as Milca Kouame speaks at the White House Domestic Policy Council.

AFSC’s tradition of bringing constituents to meet face-to-face with lawmakers is providing a beacon of hope for change within a frustrating political climate in Washington, D.C.

AFSC South Star Spring Newsletter

The South Star newsletter for AFSC's South Region.

Upper Big Branch families plead for Congressional action on mine safety

Carrying enlarged photographs of their lost loved ones, family members of three of the 29 miners killed in the 2010 explosion at West Virginia’s Upper Big Branch mine spent June 6-7 in Washington, D.C., pleading with lawmakers to take action to improve mine safety and to stiffen penalties for mining companies that knowingly, willingly, and recklessly place miners’ lives at risk.

$1 Trillion Contest Winners Visit Capitol Hill

As the historic debate over federal spending began in Washington, young winners of the “If I Had A Trillion” video contest descended on Capitol Hill, challenging lawmakers to address the bloated defense spending that imperils their schools, communities, and futures.

Opinion: This Budget Cutting Math Doesn’t Add Up

By Robin Aura Kanegis

It’s simple math: A military budget that has doubled in twelve years + worries about the resulting deficit = deep cuts to military spending. 

Responding to Violence against Those in Public Life

The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC), a Quaker organization committed to overcoming violence in communities throughout the U.S. and around the world, is deeply saddened by the violence of January 8, 2011, in Tucson, Arizona, when an attempt to kill U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords brought death and injury to so many.

Our thoughts and prayers are with all victims of the shooting, as well as their families and friends who are now mourning the deceased and anxiously awaiting the recovery of the injured. As Friends say, we are holding them in the Light.

AFSC Human Rights Educator Honored

Each year, the Washington DC Human Rights Luncheon honors those who work long and hard in their communities for human and civil rights. This year, AFSC’s Jean-Louis Peta Ikambana, Director of the DC Human Rights Learning Program, was honored with the prestigious Community Human Rights Award.

Who we are

AFSC is a Quaker organization devoted to service, development, and peace programs throughout the world. Our work is based on the belief in the worth of every person, and faith in the power of love to overcome violence and injustice. Learn more

Where we work

AFSC has offices around the world. To see a complete list see the Where We Work page.

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