Quaker

Acting in Faith podcast: Calling forth the goodness, Episode 2

"Calling forth the goodness" is a podcast series that features the voices and communities that work together to create change.

This episode, "Seeds of an Occupation," tells the story of how the AFSC is partnering with students, interfaith coalitions, and community groups to end the Israeli occupation in Palestine through the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement.

Listen and hear the voices of community members all around the country working together for change.

From the Archives: AFSC and Quakers

Bayard Rustin and Walter Nagele

Bayard Rustin and Walter Nagele

Bayard Rustin and Walter Nagele

Check out these documents from the AFSC archives on the history of the organization's relationship with Quakers.  The relationship has always been a bit rocky, but scattered throughout these documents are a consistent, genuine spirit of reconciliation and love.

Words From A Friend

Retired Earlham College professor Paul Lacey became a Quaker as he started college.   Although planning to be a civil liberties lawyer, the love of literature overcame that intention and led to his teaching career. Paul says, “That change was hard. Lawyering would do practical good for people, but teaching literature wasn’t so clear cut.  I knew that I wanted to help increase the happiness in the world, to lessen the suffering; to help liberate people from ignorance, prejudice, injustice, to live joyfully and help others to the same.

Middle East AFSC and Quaker work

Wednesday, November 10, 2010 - 7:00pm - 9:00pm

Ficr program director

FICR Program Director Kathy Bergen left with Jean Zaru

FICR Program Director Kathy Bergen left with Jean Zaru, Clerk Ramallah Friends Meeting.

Join us to hear a presentation on the work of the Friends International Center and the American Friends Service Committee- from San Francisco to Gaza and Ramallah.

Kathy Bergen will highlight the work of the Friends International Center which provides a resource to the Ramallah community and current conditions facing Palestinians, including two issues of special concern: access and movement and land confiscation and house demolitions.

 

History of AFSC Los Angeles 1942 - 1959

Material Aid

Children gathered on the lawn of the Material Aids warehouse

Children gather on the lawn of the Material Aids warehouse at 110 N. Hudon, Pasadena. In 1953, the AFSC office would move to an adjacent lot at 825 E. Union. Photo: Stanley Hall Steele

1942
AFSC "Southern California Branch" (later to be known as "Pacific Southwest Region") office was established in Pasadena, along with similar regional offices in San Francisco and Seattle. That year, the office moved to 544 E. Orange Grove Blvd., into what was then a small house adjoining Orange Grove Friends Meeting. David E. Henley was Executive Secretary of the Southern California Branch until 1946.

1942 - 1945

History of AFSC Pacific Southwest Region: 1960-Present

This House Not for Sale

Children supporting the This House Not For Sale program

This House Not for Sale was a project growing out of concerns of residents of northwest Pasadena and was an effort to help stabilize changing neighborhoods and keep property values at their current levels. Householders who intended to stay where they lived were encouraged to display the signs. The project (carried out in conjunction with All Peoples Christian Church in Los Angeles) was a precursor to further AFSC efforts through its Fair Housing Program.

1960s
The "era of activism" saw AFSC staff and volunteers participating in the Civil Rights Movement and protesting the war against Vietnam.   They advocated for fair housing in Pasadena, organized nonviolent civil disobedience trainings and demonstrations, conducted teach-ins on Vietnam at Caltech and elsewhere, and in 1967 alone over 1,400 men received draft counseling through the AFSC network.

History of AFSC Pacific Southwest Region 1917-1941

Pasadena Flour

Pasadena flour to be shipped to Russia for famine relief in 1922

These bags of flour were donated by Pasadena citizens in 1922 for Russian famine relief through the AFSC. The flour was shipped by way of the Panama Canal to New York, and then on to Russia.

Quaker presence in Southern California can be traced back to the founding of the first Monthly Meeting in the region in 1884 by Friends from Iowa—in a community that two years later would become incorporated as the city of Pasadena. In 1887, in what would become the city of Whittier (named after the Quaker poet John Greenleaf Whittier), Friends established a Monthly Meeting that eventually became known as First Friends Church.

Who we are

AFSC is a Quaker organization devoted to service, development, and peace programs throughout the world. Our work is based on the belief in the worth of every person, and faith in the power of love to overcome violence and injustice. Learn more

Where we work

AFSC has offices around the world. To see a complete list see the Where We Work page.

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