Healing Justice

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Report from the 2013 All New Hampshire Friends Gathering

Transforming a punishment-based justice system to one based on healing

Fifty Quakers and a few friends of the Friends spent most of a Saturday discussing prison conditions, prison ministry, prison policies, and other matters at the All New Hampshire Gathering of Friends, held at Wesley United Methodist Church in Concord on January 19, 2013.  

How a community heals: A conversation with Denise Altvater

Denise Altvater is a member of the Passamaquoddy Tribe and has worked for AFSC for eighteen years.  She has been instrumental in developing the first Truth and Reconciliation Commission between a sovereign Tribal Nation, the Wabanaki, and a U.S. state, Maine, to address hurts caused by the foster care system. The commission will be seated on February 12, 2013.

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Denise Altvater and siblings

Denise Altvater and siblings

Denise Altvater (far right)and siblings weeks before they were taken from the reservation and placed in a non-native foster home by the state of Maine.

NH Gathering of Friends

Saturday, January 19, 2013 - 9:00am - 3:00pm

New Hampshire Quakers, and friends of the Friends, will gather to share information, ideas, and inspiration on the theme of prisons and transformation of the criminal justice system.  After a period of worship, attenders will hear from Margaret Hawthorn of Monadnock Quaker Meeting and Jamie Bissonnette-Lewey of the AFSC's Healing Justice Program.  Workshops will discuss restorative justice, Quaker work inside prisons and jails, and public policy issues such as death penalty repeal, prison privatization, and sentencing reform.  A children's program will be based on the story o

Twin Cities Healing Justice Program

Sharon Goens, director of the Twin Cities Healing Justice Program, describes AFSC's new work for justice in Minnesota.

Love all the children: Disarming our hearts after the shootings at Sandy Hook School

In the Liberian version of the Christmas story, “Every Man Heart Lay Down,” retold by author Lorenz Graham, God is frustrated.

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Candle

Candle

Candle

Another way of life is possible: Reflections on the shootings in Newtown, Conn.

Note: I sent Max Carter a note about an unrelated matter and he sent me these reflections about the recent mass shootings in Newtown, Conn., which he posted on the Guilford College Friends Center Facebook page yesterday.  - Lucy

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The Peaceable Kingdom by Edward Hicks at the National Gallery

The Peaceable Kingdom by Edward Hicks at the National Gallery

"The Peaceable Kingdom" by Edward Hicks at the National Gallery

Youth Advocate for Justice in the Prison System

As the West Virginia Economic Justice Project addresses prison overcrowding on a policy level, the Appalachian Center for Equality Youth Leadership Program explores the racial and economic injustices of the prison industrial complex and the impact this has on their lives.

The Oppression Fashion Show 2012: Peace and Justice intern reflection

The sweet tension of waiting for people to arrive combined with the multiple colored lights filling the room, a dream of cold extremities coursing with adrenaline. I, as the door person watching the welcome table, got to say hello to most of the people to the event hopefully making a positive first impression. From my vantage point near the door I’m torn as to what might have been my most memorable experience.

Wanna SNAC? A Sampson Night Against Crime

The “29th Annual National “Night Out Against Crime” was held on Tuesday, October 16, 2012 from 5:30-7:30pm for neighborhoods throughout the Greater New Orleans Area. The American Friends Service Committee partnered with A Desire For Change community group to host our “Night Out Against Crime” at the Sampson Park in the 9th Ward Neighborhood to celebrate a commitment to peace in our communities.
 

Called to Relate: An interview with David Niyonzima

On a beautiful morning in 1993, Burundian David Niyonzima found himself caught in the middle of a violent ethnic conflict. Although he escaped unharmed, 25 people, including eight of his students at a local Quaker pastoral training school, were shot and killed. David spent the next few years fearing for his life and the safety of his family. But after a transformational experience of learning to forgive his attackers, David became committed to working for peace in his war-torn country.

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David Niyonzima

David Niyonzima

David Niyonzima

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AFSC is a Quaker organization devoted to service, development, and peace programs throughout the world. Our work is based on the belief in the worth of every person, and faith in the power of love to overcome violence and injustice. Learn more

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